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Wednesday, May 13, 2009
Start: 10:30
End: 13:00

 

PROTEST AGAINST ISRAEL'S RACIST FOREIGN MINISTER
WEDNESDAY 13 MAY 10.30AM - 12.00 NOON FOREIGN OFFICE, WHITEHALL, LONDON

STOP THE WAR COALITION NEWSLETTERNo. 1095 12 May 2009

AVIGDOR LIEBERMAN, ISRAEL'S OPENLY RACIST FOREIGN MINISTER, IS COMING TO LONDON to meet the British Foreign Secretary, David Miliband and the Shadow Foreign Secretary, William Hague, as part of his bid to strengthen ties between Europe and Israel.

PROTEST AGAINST ISRAEL'S RACIST FOREIGN MINISTER

WEDNESDAY 13 MAY 10.30AM - 12.00 NOON

FOREIGN OFFICE, WHITEHALL, LONDON

Protest called by Stop the War Coalition, Palestine Solidarity Campaign, Jews for Justice for Palestinians, British Muslim Initiative, CND, Palestinian Forum in Britain.

JOIN US to show our disgust at the government's willingness to meet with Israeli warmongers. During Israel's bombing and invasion of Gaza, Avigdor Lieberman threatened action 'just like the United States did with the Japanese in World War II', when the US used nuclear bombs to obliterate two cities.

Start: 12:30

The Irish Anti-War Movement condemns the recent US bombing in Afghanistan that may have killed as many as 147 Afghans, including many women and children.  If the reports of over 100 dead are true it will make it the most deadly incident involving civilians since foreign troops invaded Afghanistan in 2001. This one act of terror equivocates to over five Omagh bombings, which puts Hilary Clinton’s casual apology into stark perspective.

There will be a picket at Dáil Eireann on Wednesday 13 May at Dáil Eireann 12.30pm.

End: 13:12
Start: 13/05/2009 - 13:30
End: 15/05/2009 - 13:12

Stop the Slaughter of Tamils protest on  Wednesday 13th of May 2009 at 1.30 pm

Outside Dail, Kildare Street, Dublin.

All are welcome to attend.

Thursday, May 14, 2009
End: 13:12
Start: 13/05/2009 - 13:30
End: 15/05/2009 - 13:12

Stop the Slaughter of Tamils protest on  Wednesday 13th of May 2009 at 1.30 pm

Outside Dail, Kildare Street, Dublin.

All are welcome to attend.

Friday, May 15, 2009
End: 13:12
Start: 13/05/2009 - 13:30
End: 15/05/2009 - 13:12

Stop the Slaughter of Tamils protest on  Wednesday 13th of May 2009 at 1.30 pm

Outside Dail, Kildare Street, Dublin.

All are welcome to attend.

Saturday, May 16, 2009
Start: 14:00
End: 16:30

Ireland Palestine Solidarity Campaign’s

Annual General Meeting 2009

 ‘In the aftermath of Gaza and the Israeli elections – What is the future for Palestine?’Featuring: Dr. Ghada Karmi, Prof. As’ad Abdul Rahman, and Caoimhe Butterly. Chair: Marie Crawley.Saturday 16th May, 2.00 - 4.30pm in the Central Hotel, Exchequer Street, Dublin 2

Friday, May 22, 2009
(all day)
Start: 22/05/2009 - 14:00
End: 02/06/2009 - 00:13

At 7.30 in the morning on 3 June, a seven-month-old baby died in the intensive care unit of the European Gaza Hospital in the Gaza Strip. His name was Zein Ad-Din Mohammed Zu’rob, and he was suffering from a lung infection which was treatable. Denied basic equipment, the doctors in Gaza could do nothing. For weeks, the child’s parents had sought a permit from the Israelis to allow them to take him to a hospital in Jerusalem, where he would have been saved. Like many desperately sick people who apply for these permits, the parents were told they had never applied. Even if they had arrived at the Erez Crossing with an Israeli document in their hands, the odds are that they would have been turned back for refusing the demands of officials to spy or collaborate in some way. “Is it an irresponsible overstatement,” asked Richard Falk, the United Nations special rapporteur for human rights in the occupied Palestinian territories and emeritus professor of international law at Princeton University, who is Jewish, “to associate the treatment of Palestinians with [the] criminalised Nazi record of collective atrocity?

Saturday, May 23, 2009
(all day)
Start: 22/05/2009 - 14:00
End: 02/06/2009 - 00:13

At 7.30 in the morning on 3 June, a seven-month-old baby died in the intensive care unit of the European Gaza Hospital in the Gaza Strip. His name was Zein Ad-Din Mohammed Zu’rob, and he was suffering from a lung infection which was treatable. Denied basic equipment, the doctors in Gaza could do nothing. For weeks, the child’s parents had sought a permit from the Israelis to allow them to take him to a hospital in Jerusalem, where he would have been saved. Like many desperately sick people who apply for these permits, the parents were told they had never applied. Even if they had arrived at the Erez Crossing with an Israeli document in their hands, the odds are that they would have been turned back for refusing the demands of officials to spy or collaborate in some way. “Is it an irresponsible overstatement,” asked Richard Falk, the United Nations special rapporteur for human rights in the occupied Palestinian territories and emeritus professor of international law at Princeton University, who is Jewish, “to associate the treatment of Palestinians with [the] criminalised Nazi record of collective atrocity?

Sunday, May 24, 2009
(all day)
Start: 22/05/2009 - 14:00
End: 02/06/2009 - 00:13

At 7.30 in the morning on 3 June, a seven-month-old baby died in the intensive care unit of the European Gaza Hospital in the Gaza Strip. His name was Zein Ad-Din Mohammed Zu’rob, and he was suffering from a lung infection which was treatable. Denied basic equipment, the doctors in Gaza could do nothing. For weeks, the child’s parents had sought a permit from the Israelis to allow them to take him to a hospital in Jerusalem, where he would have been saved. Like many desperately sick people who apply for these permits, the parents were told they had never applied. Even if they had arrived at the Erez Crossing with an Israeli document in their hands, the odds are that they would have been turned back for refusing the demands of officials to spy or collaborate in some way. “Is it an irresponsible overstatement,” asked Richard Falk, the United Nations special rapporteur for human rights in the occupied Palestinian territories and emeritus professor of international law at Princeton University, who is Jewish, “to associate the treatment of Palestinians with [the] criminalised Nazi record of collective atrocity?

Monday, May 25, 2009
(all day)
Start: 22/05/2009 - 14:00
End: 02/06/2009 - 00:13

At 7.30 in the morning on 3 June, a seven-month-old baby died in the intensive care unit of the European Gaza Hospital in the Gaza Strip. His name was Zein Ad-Din Mohammed Zu’rob, and he was suffering from a lung infection which was treatable. Denied basic equipment, the doctors in Gaza could do nothing. For weeks, the child’s parents had sought a permit from the Israelis to allow them to take him to a hospital in Jerusalem, where he would have been saved. Like many desperately sick people who apply for these permits, the parents were told they had never applied. Even if they had arrived at the Erez Crossing with an Israeli document in their hands, the odds are that they would have been turned back for refusing the demands of officials to spy or collaborate in some way. “Is it an irresponsible overstatement,” asked Richard Falk, the United Nations special rapporteur for human rights in the occupied Palestinian territories and emeritus professor of international law at Princeton University, who is Jewish, “to associate the treatment of Palestinians with [the] criminalised Nazi record of collective atrocity?

Tuesday, May 26, 2009
(all day)
Start: 22/05/2009 - 14:00
End: 02/06/2009 - 00:13

At 7.30 in the morning on 3 June, a seven-month-old baby died in the intensive care unit of the European Gaza Hospital in the Gaza Strip. His name was Zein Ad-Din Mohammed Zu’rob, and he was suffering from a lung infection which was treatable. Denied basic equipment, the doctors in Gaza could do nothing. For weeks, the child’s parents had sought a permit from the Israelis to allow them to take him to a hospital in Jerusalem, where he would have been saved. Like many desperately sick people who apply for these permits, the parents were told they had never applied. Even if they had arrived at the Erez Crossing with an Israeli document in their hands, the odds are that they would have been turned back for refusing the demands of officials to spy or collaborate in some way. “Is it an irresponsible overstatement,” asked Richard Falk, the United Nations special rapporteur for human rights in the occupied Palestinian territories and emeritus professor of international law at Princeton University, who is Jewish, “to associate the treatment of Palestinians with [the] criminalised Nazi record of collective atrocity?

Wednesday, May 27, 2009
(all day)
Start: 22/05/2009 - 14:00
End: 02/06/2009 - 00:13

At 7.30 in the morning on 3 June, a seven-month-old baby died in the intensive care unit of the European Gaza Hospital in the Gaza Strip. His name was Zein Ad-Din Mohammed Zu’rob, and he was suffering from a lung infection which was treatable. Denied basic equipment, the doctors in Gaza could do nothing. For weeks, the child’s parents had sought a permit from the Israelis to allow them to take him to a hospital in Jerusalem, where he would have been saved. Like many desperately sick people who apply for these permits, the parents were told they had never applied. Even if they had arrived at the Erez Crossing with an Israeli document in their hands, the odds are that they would have been turned back for refusing the demands of officials to spy or collaborate in some way. “Is it an irresponsible overstatement,” asked Richard Falk, the United Nations special rapporteur for human rights in the occupied Palestinian territories and emeritus professor of international law at Princeton University, who is Jewish, “to associate the treatment of Palestinians with [the] criminalised Nazi record of collective atrocity?

Thursday, May 28, 2009
(all day)
Start: 22/05/2009 - 14:00
End: 02/06/2009 - 00:13

At 7.30 in the morning on 3 June, a seven-month-old baby died in the intensive care unit of the European Gaza Hospital in the Gaza Strip. His name was Zein Ad-Din Mohammed Zu’rob, and he was suffering from a lung infection which was treatable. Denied basic equipment, the doctors in Gaza could do nothing. For weeks, the child’s parents had sought a permit from the Israelis to allow them to take him to a hospital in Jerusalem, where he would have been saved. Like many desperately sick people who apply for these permits, the parents were told they had never applied. Even if they had arrived at the Erez Crossing with an Israeli document in their hands, the odds are that they would have been turned back for refusing the demands of officials to spy or collaborate in some way. “Is it an irresponsible overstatement,” asked Richard Falk, the United Nations special rapporteur for human rights in the occupied Palestinian territories and emeritus professor of international law at Princeton University, who is Jewish, “to associate the treatment of Palestinians with [the] criminalised Nazi record of collective atrocity?

Friday, May 29, 2009
(all day)
Start: 22/05/2009 - 14:00
End: 02/06/2009 - 00:13

At 7.30 in the morning on 3 June, a seven-month-old baby died in the intensive care unit of the European Gaza Hospital in the Gaza Strip. His name was Zein Ad-Din Mohammed Zu’rob, and he was suffering from a lung infection which was treatable. Denied basic equipment, the doctors in Gaza could do nothing. For weeks, the child’s parents had sought a permit from the Israelis to allow them to take him to a hospital in Jerusalem, where he would have been saved. Like many desperately sick people who apply for these permits, the parents were told they had never applied. Even if they had arrived at the Erez Crossing with an Israeli document in their hands, the odds are that they would have been turned back for refusing the demands of officials to spy or collaborate in some way. “Is it an irresponsible overstatement,” asked Richard Falk, the United Nations special rapporteur for human rights in the occupied Palestinian territories and emeritus professor of international law at Princeton University, who is Jewish, “to associate the treatment of Palestinians with [the] criminalised Nazi record of collective atrocity?

End: 23:41
Start: 29/05/2009 - 21:00
End: 31/05/2009 - 23:41

GALWAY ALLIANCE AGAINST WAR

 

NO TO THE RAF "RED ARROWS" KILLERS

 

FUNDRAISING GIG

29TH MAY 2009 AT 9PM

Saturday, May 30, 2009
(all day)
Start: 22/05/2009 - 14:00
End: 02/06/2009 - 00:13

At 7.30 in the morning on 3 June, a seven-month-old baby died in the intensive care unit of the European Gaza Hospital in the Gaza Strip. His name was Zein Ad-Din Mohammed Zu’rob, and he was suffering from a lung infection which was treatable. Denied basic equipment, the doctors in Gaza could do nothing. For weeks, the child’s parents had sought a permit from the Israelis to allow them to take him to a hospital in Jerusalem, where he would have been saved. Like many desperately sick people who apply for these permits, the parents were told they had never applied. Even if they had arrived at the Erez Crossing with an Israeli document in their hands, the odds are that they would have been turned back for refusing the demands of officials to spy or collaborate in some way. “Is it an irresponsible overstatement,” asked Richard Falk, the United Nations special rapporteur for human rights in the occupied Palestinian territories and emeritus professor of international law at Princeton University, who is Jewish, “to associate the treatment of Palestinians with [the] criminalised Nazi record of collective atrocity?

End: 23:41
Start: 29/05/2009 - 21:00
End: 31/05/2009 - 23:41

GALWAY ALLIANCE AGAINST WAR

 

NO TO THE RAF "RED ARROWS" KILLERS

 

FUNDRAISING GIG

29TH MAY 2009 AT 9PM

(all day)
Start: 30/05/2009 - 12:00
End: 01/06/2009 - 23:49

Galway Alliance Against War 99 RED BALLOON PEACE EVENT 30TH MAY 2009 AT 12 NOON SPANISH ARCH, GALWAY

NO TO THE RAF "RED ARROWS" KILLERS

 

Sunday, May 31, 2009
(all day)
Start: 22/05/2009 - 14:00
End: 02/06/2009 - 00:13

At 7.30 in the morning on 3 June, a seven-month-old baby died in the intensive care unit of the European Gaza Hospital in the Gaza Strip. His name was Zein Ad-Din Mohammed Zu’rob, and he was suffering from a lung infection which was treatable. Denied basic equipment, the doctors in Gaza could do nothing. For weeks, the child’s parents had sought a permit from the Israelis to allow them to take him to a hospital in Jerusalem, where he would have been saved. Like many desperately sick people who apply for these permits, the parents were told they had never applied. Even if they had arrived at the Erez Crossing with an Israeli document in their hands, the odds are that they would have been turned back for refusing the demands of officials to spy or collaborate in some way. “Is it an irresponsible overstatement,” asked Richard Falk, the United Nations special rapporteur for human rights in the occupied Palestinian territories and emeritus professor of international law at Princeton University, who is Jewish, “to associate the treatment of Palestinians with [the] criminalised Nazi record of collective atrocity?

End: 23:41
Start: 29/05/2009 - 21:00
End: 31/05/2009 - 23:41

GALWAY ALLIANCE AGAINST WAR

 

NO TO THE RAF "RED ARROWS" KILLERS

 

FUNDRAISING GIG

29TH MAY 2009 AT 9PM

(all day)
Start: 30/05/2009 - 12:00
End: 01/06/2009 - 23:49

Galway Alliance Against War 99 RED BALLOON PEACE EVENT 30TH MAY 2009 AT 12 NOON SPANISH ARCH, GALWAY

NO TO THE RAF "RED ARROWS" KILLERS

 

Monday, June 1, 2009
End: 00:13
Start: 22/05/2009 - 14:00
End: 02/06/2009 - 00:13

At 7.30 in the morning on 3 June, a seven-month-old baby died in the intensive care unit of the European Gaza Hospital in the Gaza Strip. His name was Zein Ad-Din Mohammed Zu’rob, and he was suffering from a lung infection which was treatable. Denied basic equipment, the doctors in Gaza could do nothing. For weeks, the child’s parents had sought a permit from the Israelis to allow them to take him to a hospital in Jerusalem, where he would have been saved. Like many desperately sick people who apply for these permits, the parents were told they had never applied. Even if they had arrived at the Erez Crossing with an Israeli document in their hands, the odds are that they would have been turned back for refusing the demands of officials to spy or collaborate in some way. “Is it an irresponsible overstatement,” asked Richard Falk, the United Nations special rapporteur for human rights in the occupied Palestinian territories and emeritus professor of international law at Princeton University, who is Jewish, “to associate the treatment of Palestinians with [the] criminalised Nazi record of collective atrocity?

End: 23:49
Start: 30/05/2009 - 12:00
End: 01/06/2009 - 23:49

Galway Alliance Against War 99 RED BALLOON PEACE EVENT 30TH MAY 2009 AT 12 NOON SPANISH ARCH, GALWAY

NO TO THE RAF "RED ARROWS" KILLERS

 

Tuesday, June 2, 2009
End: 00:13
Start: 22/05/2009 - 14:00
End: 02/06/2009 - 00:13

At 7.30 in the morning on 3 June, a seven-month-old baby died in the intensive care unit of the European Gaza Hospital in the Gaza Strip. His name was Zein Ad-Din Mohammed Zu’rob, and he was suffering from a lung infection which was treatable. Denied basic equipment, the doctors in Gaza could do nothing. For weeks, the child’s parents had sought a permit from the Israelis to allow them to take him to a hospital in Jerusalem, where he would have been saved. Like many desperately sick people who apply for these permits, the parents were told they had never applied. Even if they had arrived at the Erez Crossing with an Israeli document in their hands, the odds are that they would have been turned back for refusing the demands of officials to spy or collaborate in some way. “Is it an irresponsible overstatement,” asked Richard Falk, the United Nations special rapporteur for human rights in the occupied Palestinian territories and emeritus professor of international law at Princeton University, who is Jewish, “to associate the treatment of Palestinians with [the] criminalised Nazi record of collective atrocity?

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