Iran

DEMONSTRATION: DON'T ATTACK IRAN - END SANCTIONS NOW

 

Demonstration at Dail Eireann - Don't Attack Iran - End Sanctions Now

11/10/2012 - 17:30
11/10/2012 - 18:30

The Irish Anti War Movement are calling a demostration at Dail Eireann calling on the Irish Government to condemn the almost daily threat of war and harsh sanctions imposed on the people of Iran. The sanctions are impacting severley on the most vuneralble sectors of Iranian society and are endorsed by the Irish government. They are allowing the Iranian regime to further repress women, civil rights activists and marginalized groups. There has been no evidence found to show that Iran is diverting uranium into a nuclear weapons programme and the threat of a military attack and debilitating sanctions are unlawful under the UN charter for human rights. Show solidarity with the people of Iran. Don't attack Iran - End sanctions now

‘Smart’ Sanctions – Still a Blunt Instrument of War?

‘Smart’ Sanctions – Still a Blunt Instrument of War?
By Lola Hynes - Irish Anti War Movement

 The daily threat of war and the implementation of harsh economic sanctions have crippled the Iranian economy and are causing devastating effects on ordinary Iranian people. There has been some form of sanctions imposed on the Iranian people by the West since the 1979 revolution; however since 2010 they have been greatly intensified and are unprecedented in their severity. These sanctions violate international law and the UN charter for their damage to Iran’s civilian population. The sanctions regime constitutes an illegitimate form of collective punishment toward the weakest and poorest members of society; women, children, the poor, the chronically ill and refugees. The latest rounds of so called ‘smart’ sanctions imposed by the US and the EU are designed to target the state and not the people. However as they affect the banking, financial and oil sectors they are having a detrimental effect on the economy and therefore the Iranian people. As noted by the former UK representative Peter Jenkins to the UNSC the sanctions are unlawful under article 39 of the UN constitution as no evidence of diverting uranium into a nuclear weapons programme has been found.

 

 

Time to ask on anniversary of 9/11: who pays and who profits from endless US wars?

JOHNNY BARBER - COUNTERPUNCH

On average, one US soldier dies everyday. Not an enormous sum, unless it is your mother, father, son or daughter that has perished. Few Americans notice. Afghan loses are not reported.

ELEVEN YEARS LATER, we are still at war. Bullets, mortars and drones are still extracting payment. Thousands, tens of thousands, millions have paid in full. Children and even those yet to be born will continue to pay for decades to come.

On a single day in Iraq last week there were 29 bombing attacks in 19 cities, killing 111 civilians and wounding another 235. On Sept 9th, reports indicate 88 people were killed and another 270 injured in 30 attacks all across the country. Iraq continues in a seemingly endless death spiral into chaos. In his acceptance speech for the Democratic nomination for President, Obama claimed he ended the war in Iraq, well… not quite.

The city of Fallujah remains under siege. Not from US troops, but from a deluge of birth defects that have plagued families since the use of depleted uranium and white phosphorus by US forces in 2004. No government studies have provided a direct link to the use of these weapons because no government studies have been undertaken, and none are contemplated.

Dr. Samira Alani, a pediatric specialist at Fallujah General Hospital, told Al Jazeera,

US attack on Iran would take hundreds of planes, ships and missiles

US attack on Iran would take hundreds of planes, ships and missiles
09 September 2012     Noah Shachtman     Iran

The US has aircraft carriers, gunboats, minesweepers, and robot subs stationed in Bahrain and sold billions of dollars’ worth of arms to Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, and the United Arab Emirates.

By Noah Shachtman
Wired
7 September 2012

Note by Stop the War: Iran is breaking no law by developing nuclear power capabilities, as it is entitled to do under the Nuclear No-Proliferation Treaty - to which it is a signatory, unlike Israel, the only Middle East country with an arsenal of nuclear weapons. No evidence has been found to show that Iran has plans to develop nuclear weapons.

SHOULD THE US actually take Benjamin Netanyahu’s advice and attack Iran, don’t expect a few sorties flown by a couple of fighter jocks.

Setting back Iran’s nuclear efforts will need to be an all-out effort, with squadrons of bombers and fighter jets, teams of commandos, rings of interceptor missiles and whole Navy carrier strike groups — plus enough drones, surveillance gear, tanker aircraft and logistical support to make such a massive mission go.

And all of it, at best, would buy the US and Israel another decade of a nuke-free Iran.

There’s been a lot of loose talk and leaked tales about what an attack on Iran might ultimately entail. Anthony Cordesman, one of Washington’s best-connected defense analysts, has put together a remarkably detailed inventory of what it would take to strike Iran, cataloging everything from the number of bombers required to the types of bombs they ought to carry.
He analyzes both Israeli and American strikes, both nuclear and not. He examines possible Iranian counterattacks, and ways to neutralize them. It leads Cordesman to a two-fold conclusion:

War Fever As Seen From Iran by Pepe Escobar

War Fever As Seen From Iran Absent the possibility of joining the Curiosity rover on Mars, there's nowhere to hide from the "Bomb Iran" hysteria relentlessly emanating from Tel Aviv and its Washington outposts. Now that even includes third-rate hacks suggesting US President Barack Obama should go in person to Israel to appease the warmongering duo Bibi-Barak [1].
So it's time for something completely different - and totally absent from Western corporate media; sound Iranian minds rationally analyzing what's really going on behind the drums of war - regarding Iran, Turkey, the Arab world and across Eurasia.

Let's start with ambassador Hossein Mousavian, a research scholar at Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, a former spokesperson for the Iranian nuclear negotiating team from 2003 to 2005, and the author of The Iranian Nuclear Crisis: A Memoir .  Writing at the Arms Control Association website [2] , Mousavian goes straight to the point;

"The history of Iran's nuclear program suggests that the West is inadvertently pushing Iran toward nuclear weapons."

In seven key steps, he outlines how this happened - starting with Iran's "entrance into the nuclear field", owed largely, by the way, to Washington; "In the 1970s, the Shah [of Iran] had ambitious plans for expanding the nuclear program, envisioning 23 nuclear power plants by 1994, with support from the United States."

Mousavian stresses how, from 2003 to 2005, during the first Bush administration,

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