Afghanistan

Afghanistan’s Bloody Sunday - Socialist Worker, 180312.

Afghanistan’s Bloody Sunday

 

Protests have erupted in Afghanistan in outrage at the news of the killing of 16 civilians in the villages of Alkozai and Najeeban in the south of the country.

In the early hours of Sunday morning at least one US soldier murdered them in their beds.

Nine were children. Most were shot in the head. Their bodies were then wrapped in blankets and set alight.

The villages are over three miles apart. Early reports quoted witnesses saying a number of soldiers were involved and that helicopters were flying overhead during the attack.

Afghan guards also report seeing the sergeant accused of the attack taking two trips out of the base that night. He returned from one at 12.30am then left again at 2am.

How many civilian massacres does it take to see the systematic savagery of US soldiers?

How many civilian massacres does it take to see the systematic savagery of US soldiers?
16 March 2012     Nima Shirazi     USA and the War on Terror
The killing has gone on unabated for ten years and is routinely ignored by the mainstream media, which choose instead to praise American soldiers for their heroism and sacrifice.
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By Nima Shirazi
Wide Asleep in America
11 March 2012
 
The bodies of Afghan civilians loaded into the back of a truck in Alkozai village of Panjwayi district of Kandahar
Nearly eight years ago, on April 1, 2004, former speech writer and Special Assistant to Ronald Reagan, Peggy Noonan wrote an article for the Wall Street Journal, where she was a contributing editor. It began like this (emphasis in original):

The world is used to bad news and always has been, but now and then there occurs something so brutal, so outside the normal limits of what used to be called man's inhumanity to man, that you have to look away. Then you force yourself to look and see and only one thought is possible: This must stop now. You wonder, how can we do it? And your mind says, immediately: Whatever it takes.

The brutal, inhuman event she was referring to was the killing in the Iraqi city of Fallujah of four American civilian contractors, whose SUV was ambushed by rocket-propelled grenades the day before.  The four men, all employees of the infamous mercenary outfit Blackwater, were shot, their bodies burned, mutilated, and dragged through the streets in celebration.  The charred corpses of two of those killed that day were strung up on a bridge over the Euphrates River.  The news, and accompanying photographs, sent shockwaves of horror and disgust through the United States and prompted endless editorials from coast to coast.

Why is Obama outraged when a "rogue" soldier murders civilians but not by his own drone attacks?

Why is Obama outraged when a "rogue" soldier murders civilians but not by his own drone attacks?

Is there a morally significant difference between the massacre of 16 civilians by a US Army sergeant and "collateral damage"? Ask Afghan civilians, says former US marine Ross Caputi.


Obama and Cameron may fool themselves over Afghanistan but they can't fool 73% of us

Obama and Cameron may fool themselves over Afghanistan but they can't fool 73% of us

13 March 2012
Robin Beste
Afghanistan and Pakistan

The latest poll shows that seven in ten people believe that the Afghan war is unwinnable and even the media is beginning to catch up with what has long been obvious to the British public.
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By Robin Beste
Stop the War Coalition
13 March 2012

"No, Barack, I'm not kidding. 73% of people in Britain really do think the war is unwinnable."

"Success in the Afghan province of Helmand is within the Army's grasp," head of the British army General Sir Peter Wall wrote in The Sun on Sunday on 11 March 2012. "Our soldiers are making a huge difference… Security in Afghanistan is vital to our safety back home."

It's the same line spun by David Cameron, who said yesterday that nothing must "derail the very good work that American and British and other Isaf forces are doing in Afghanistan".

They really do think the British public was born yesterday if they think we'll swallow this nonsense.

The war now in its eleventh year -- lasting longer than the combined total of World War I and II -- has been a catastrophe from beginning to its fast approaching end.

It has brought nothing by mass slaughter and devastation to the Afghan people and huge cost in lives and money to the United States, Britain and the other invading countries.

The reality of this pointless war has been brought home in recent weeks by the massacre of 16 Afghan civilians by a US soldier, the killing of six British troops on 7 March, the deliberate burning of the Koran by the US Army, which provoked nationwide outrage, and the pictures of US troops urinating on the bodies of Afghans they had killed.

The latest slaughter in Afghanistan is part of a decade of savage civilian killing: until Nato leaves, it is certain to continue

Comment is free

Massacres are the inevitable result of foreign occupation | Seumas Milne

Afghan villagers during a prayer ceremony for victims of Sunday's killing of civilians, apparently by a lone US soldier, in Panjwai. Photograph: Allauddin Khan/AP Afghan villagers during a prayer ceremony for victims of Sunday's killing of civilians, apparently by a lone US soldier, in Panjwai. Photograph: Allauddin Khan/AP

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Tuesday 13 March 2012

US forces Kill 16 Civilians, Afghanistan

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