Egypt

CAIRO - Mass march on parliament called for Friday in protest over football massacre

Mass march on parliament called for Friday in protest over football massacre

A group of 28 revolutionary movements call for a mass march Friday to demand an immediate hand over of power to a civilian government, charging the military with complicity in Wednesday's football riots in Port Said

PORT SAID MASSACRE – EYE WITNESS ACCOUNT

PORT SAID MASSACRE – EYE WITNESS ACCOUNT

What happened in Port Said as told by @Heemalization English version

The Revolution has not failed - it just stalled, and is now back live on the streets!

The Revolution has not failed - it just stalled, and is now back live on the streets!
The Egyptian masses have done it again. They bring cheer to the hearts of all anti war activists across the world at a time of new warmongering by our own western leaders. They show immense courage in the face of horrific violence vetted out to them by the Supreme Council of the Armed Force’s (SCAF) boot boys – the black-clad Central Security Forces - back in November and December. They show once again a glimpse of a different world – of tolerance, justice and freedom, a world without war and where no child will die because of lack of food or healthcare.

On Wednesday 25 January 2012 the Egyptian people occupied streets and squares across Egypt to celebrate the anniversary of their revolution that overthrew the western backed military dictator Hosni Mubarak. Hundreds of thousands packed in to Tahrir Square having marched from as far as Giza, Mohandissen, Shubra and other outer suburbs. They crowded the streets around the square and stretched across the bridges over the river Nile leading to the square. Ten thousand students alone marched from Cairo University. Tens of thousands also converged on squares in Alexandria, Suez, Ismailiya, Mahala and other cities throughout Egypt. Many protesters carried empty coffins to commemorate their slain friends and relations.

The Unfinished Revolution: We Must Stand Shoulder to Shoulder With the Egyptian Protesters - Bianca Jagger, 250112

Bianca JaggerFounder and Chair, Bianca Jagger Human Rights Foundation

The Unfinished Revolution: We Must Stand Shoulder to Shoulder With the Egyptian Protesters

Today, January 25th 2012, marks an historic date for Egypt. On this day last year millions of people stood in the now iconic Tahrir Square, peacefully demanding 'Bread, Freedom and Dignity'. The number of protesters gathered in Tahrir, asking for their basic human rights, was unprecedented in Egypt's history. It was not only the size of the assembled crowd that made this day different, but its diversity. During the 18 days of uprising people from all walks of life, religions, ideologies and ages stood together as one in the square for a common purpose: to end thirty years of brutal dictatorship.

On the 11th of February 2011, Hosni Mubarak finally capitulated to the pressure from the millions of Egyptian protesters and stepped down as President of Egypt, handing over power to the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces (SCAF). The atmosphere in Egypt in those days following was exhilarating, electrifying. The people had achieved a peaceful, leaderless revolution. Millions of jubilant Egyptians chanted together 'The army and the people are one hand'.

Unity of Tahrir has dissolved as 'new Egypt' proves elusive MICHAEL JANSEN, IRISH TIMES, 250112.

Unity of Tahrir has dissolved as 'new Egypt' proves elusive

MICHAEL JANSEN

A YEAR ago, tens of thousands of Egyptians responded to a call by internet activists to protest against police brutality by taking to the streets and squares of their country and launching an uprising that toppled 30-year Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak.

Demonstrators, who numbered 50,000 in Cairo’s Tahrir (Liberation) Square alone, were attacked by armed police and plain-clothes interior ministry “thugs” seeking to clear the square. But the protesters remained and fought off constant assaults for 18 days until the armed forces high command sided with the protesters and staged a coup against Mubarak.

The generals pledged to speed up the transition to multiparty democracy and hand over to a civilian authority within six months. This was not honoured.

Today the generals are set to commemorate the dramatic popular uprising that caught the imagination of people around the world. But activists who caused the uprising are calling for the ousting of the military council, which continues to wield power even though it has overseen the dissolution of the old people’s assembly and the election of a new parliament, which was inaugurated on Monday.

Unfortunately, the unity of purpose that powered the uprising quickly dissipated. More than 50 revolutionary movements, factions, alliances and parties are behind today’s demonstrations.

However, the majority of Egyptians, weary of constant protests, strikes and disruptions, simply seek a quiet life. They have repudiated activists seeking protracted revolution by voting for constitutional amendments proposed by the generals and have given Muslim fundamentalist parties, prepared to collude with the military, overwhelming control of the people’s assembly.

In the run-up to today’s protests, the revolutionaries were squabbling over arrangements and objectives.

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